Thursday, March 17, 2011

European Grapevine Moth - Steps toward eradication in 2011

In September of 2009, the European Grapevine Moth (EGVM) was discovered in Napa County. Native to Italy, the pest is one of the most disruptive to grapevines, multiplying three times within a single growing season and producing larvae that feed on grape clusters. The first year it was discovered in Napa the moth destroyed an entire vineyard in Oakville, leading to widespread concern about future crop damage in the Napa Valley.

Harnessing the urgency of the situation, Dave Whitmer, Napa County’s Agricultural Commissioner, and Monica Cooper, Napa County’s Farm Advisor, along with Napa Valley Vintners, Napa Valley Grapegrowers, Napa County’s Farm Bureau and local environmental groups, coordinated a county-wide effort to control the moth during the 2010 growing season that included over 5,000 traps, a quarantine during harvest, spray applications of ovicide and larvicide, and pheromone mating disruption. As a result of these efforts, vineyard crop damage was greatly reduced in 2010, turning what was largely seen as a potentially catastrophic threat to Napa vineyards into a success story in pest and environmental management.

While significant progress was made in 2010 in quarantining and reducing EGVM populations, experts agree that continued vigilance in combating the moth in 2011 is key to completely eradicating the moth in the Napa Valley.

For the 2011 growing season, it is recommended that all grape growers within 500 meters of a moth trapped in 2010 treat the first two generations with ovicide and/or larvicide and put up Isomate pheromone mating disruption twist-ties in their vineyards. The county will again set traps throughout the Napa Valley to asses the location and volume of the moths throughout the season and quarantines during harvest are recommended.

Home winemakers also play an important role in eradicating the moth and complying with EGVM standards. For example, as EGVM can be spread via green waste, any residue from home winemaking should be double bagged and placed in a trash can and should not be added to compost piles. To comply with the quarantine, home winemakers who use custom grape facilities for their wines should use facilities within their quarantine area. More information for Napa homeowners can be found here.

Questions or want to be on the County’s mailing list for further updates? Contact Napa County EGVM Grower Liaison Martin Mochizuki.

Follow updates on Kick the Moth Out! on Facebook

Additional Resources

EGVM Management – County of Napa
EGVM Management – UC Davis Cooperative Extension
Presentation on 2010 EGVM Management efforts

(Photo Credit: Kick The Moth Out! Facebook Page)

33 comments:

Napa Valley Vintners said...

EGVM Recent update from Martin Mochizuki, Napa County EGVM Grower Liaison
"Cooler than normal weather has delayed the start of the first flight of the European Grapevine Moth in Napa county. Monica Cooper from UC Cooperative Extension reports that there have been 150 degree days from Jan.1 which coincides to the start of the moth emergence in the first flight. When temperatures start to warm up then the flight should begin in earnest and mating and egg-laying should occur. Isomate pheromones should be applied in the next couple of weeks for mating disruption. The Technical Working Group has recommended that all growers within 500 meters of a find should use the pheromones at 200 per acre and also treat the first two generations with chemical sprays (organic or conventional) in order to eradicate this pest. Sprays should be applied based on the degree day model for the start of egg hatch. Based on the present weather pattern this will probably not be until the end of April for vineyards with early to normal budbreak. Vineyards with late breaking varieties or in cooler areas should time the first spray to the six inch shoot growth stage of the vine. High label rates of Intrepid or Altacor should be used for conventional growers and Dipel or Entrust for organic growers. Please call if you have any questions about treatrments or vineyards in the treatment area - 707-975-2133."

Napa Valley Vintners said...

3/21 EGVM update from Martin Mochizuki, Napa County EGVM Grower Liaison
"Cool wet weather has slowed the emergence of adult European Grapevine Moths in Napa County. As the weather warms the first flight of moths should continue. Isomate pheromones should be applied at 200 per acre prior to budbreak. There is anecdotal evidence from Chile that vineyards that were able to eliminate this insect used both mating disruption with the pheromones along with spray applications for the larvae. Areas that only used the spray applications still had low populations of the EGVM. The Technical Working Group recommends all growers within 500 meters of a previous moth find apply Isomate pheromones and treat the first two generations of larvae. The start of egg hatch as predicted by the degree day model should be close to the end of April depending on the temperatures. In areas with late developing varieties the first spray application should be put on at 6 inches of shoot growth. Residential treatments with pheromones may begin in April in areas where the insect was found in the third generation last season. If you have a vineyard in these areas and you are not using Isomate pheromones for mating disruption, there is a chance that nearby residences will not be treated due to lower efficacy of the pheromones next to untreated vineyards."

Napa Valley Vintners said...

3/28 update from Martin Mochizuki, Napa County EGVM Grower Liaison
As the weather finally warms up this week we should see the start of the first flight of the European Grapevine Moth in Napa County. Growers are also reporting budbreak in some early varieties. The Technical Working Group recommendation is for all growers within 500 meters of a moth find in 2010 to treat with Isomate pheromones at 200 per acre prior to budbreak and to treat with insecticides (organic or conventional) the first two generations. The timing for the first spray application will depend on the predicted egg hatch by the degree day model and the stage of growth of the vine. The vines must have at least 6 inches of shoot growth to apply this first spray effectively, and it looks like the timing for egg hatch will be towards the end of April, but that can change depending on the weather. Ideally, one spray for each generation should be applied for conventional growers. High label rates of Intrepid or Altacor will last 21 days. Other materials will also work but the residual may not last as long, and a second spray may be needed in the first generation if the residual runs out. For organic sprays Dipel or other BT products and Entrust will last about 7 days so multiple sprays will be needed to cover each flight. All of these materials will mix with most mildew sprays so they can be applied together. Please check with your pest control advisor and winery representatives before applying any products.

Napa Valley Vintners said...

4/4/11 update from Martin Mochizuki, Napa County EGVM Grower Liaison

Isomate pheromones should be applied now at the rate of 200 per acre to all vineyards within 500 meters of a European Grapevine moth find from last season. Remember to report the Isomate pheromones in your monthly pesticide use reports. In order to be released from the EGVM quarantine, you must go five consecutive generations without finding any life stages of the moth. In Chile it was found that areas that used the pheromones and sprayed insecticides were able to eliminate EGVM, but vineyards that just sprayed were able to only lower the level of infestation and not completely eliminate them. Also, residential treatments with pheromones are being planned initially for the infested areas in the Carneros and American Canyon areas. If growers in these infested areas choose not to treat with pheromones then CDFA will not treat the nearby residences due to the ineffectiveness of the pheromones if large areas are not treated together. EGVM moth trap counts and locations can be monitored on the Napa County Agricultural Commissioner website at

http://www.countyofnapa.org/AgCommissioner/EGM/



The recent warm weather has sped up the development of the European Grapevine moth in Napa County. The predicted first spray applications,based on the degree day model for peak egg-hatch, should be applied in 14-21 days, depending on the weather. If you do not have a minimum of six inches of shoot growth at that time you should delay your treatment until you reach that stage of growth. Conventional vineyards should be able to spray just once to cover this hatch unless the weather cools down and causes an extended hatch period. Intrepid and Altacor at the maximum label rates should give 21 days of coverage and give some flexibility on the timing due to their ovicidal and larvicidal activity. Other conventional materials will kill only the larvae and will have shorter residual activity. Organic products, including BT products and Entrust, last only about seven days and should be applied a minimum of three applications for this first generation and should be reapplied immediately after a rain event. Remember to always check with your local PCA and your winery representatives before applying any products to your vines. For more information on the degree day modeling and product information visit the Napa County UC Cooperative Extension website at

http://ucanr.org/NapaEGVM

Napa Valley Vintners said...

4/11/11 update from Martin Mochizuki, Napa County EGVM Grower Liaison

Cooler than normal temperatures has slowed the degree day accumulation for the European Grapevine Moth in Napa County. So far, there have been no moth finds in the state detection traps in Napa, although moths were found last week in a previously infested area of Santa Clara County. It is still not too late to install Isomate pheromone dispensers as this will cause mating disruption for all three flights of the insect. The timing for the fist spray applicatons has been delayed and although the timing is highly dependent on the weather over the next two weeks, this spray timing should be in approximately 10-20 days. Remember that the moths will only lay eggs on exposed clusters. So, DO NOT apply any materials until vines have at least 6 inches of shoot growth. If the vines have less than 6 inches of shoot growth at the timing of peak egg hatch then wait until they have reached the 6 inch stage before spraying. Intrepid and Altacor are the most flexible and longest lasting materials for conventional vineyards, and BT products and Entrust are the materials for organic growers. Conventional growers should be able to get by with one timed spray for this first generation, and organic growers will need to spray every 7 days until the end of the egg hatch period.



Degree day information is available on the UC Cooperative Extension website.

http://ucanr.org/NapaEGVM



Trap catch information and last years trap catch areas are available on the Napa County Agricultural Commissioners website.

http://www.countyofnapa.org/AgCommissioner/EGM/



For a short time only, there are funds available for reimbursement for treatment expenses for EGVM from the NRCS. For more information call Kelly Gin at (707) 252-4189 Ext. 104

Napa Valley Vintners said...

4/18/11 update from Martin Mochizuki, Napa County EGVM Grower Liaison

A few moths were caught in several locations in Napa county last week. Viable eggs were also found at one site by UC Cooperative Extension personnel. It is still possible to apply Isomate pheromone dispensers to disrupt the flight of the first generation of moths but more importantly this will cause mating disruption for the next two flights. Remember, that in order to lift the quarantine there must be no moths caught for five generations. An adjustment was made this week to the degree day model which pushed the time period for egg hatch back a few days. Spray applications in Napa County should be started the week of April 25th. If you do not have six inches of shoot grwoth at this time then wait until you reach that stage of growth before your first application. These sprays can be combined in your scheduled mildew sprays. For conventional growers, Intrepid or Altacor should last for 21 days and only one application should be necessary for the first generation. Organic growers should use BT products or Entrust and repeat the applications every 7 days until the end of the egg hatch period. There should be a minimum of three applications for the first generation. Organic products will need to be re-applied after a rain event. Olives in the treatment area should be treated at bloom with Dipel or Javelin.



To keep updated on the degree day model see the Napa UC Cooperative Extension website at:

http://ucanr.org/NapaEGVM



For information on current trap counts and locations see the Napa County Agricultural Commissioners website at:

http://www.countyofnapa.org/AgCommissioner/EGM/

Napa Valley Vintners said...

4/26/11 update from Martin Mochizuki, Napa County EGVM Grower Liaison

European Grapevine Moths were caught in several new areas of Napa County this week. The new areas are adjacent to previously infested areas: in the Browns Valley area off of Buhman Rd, near the intersection of Petrified Forest Rd, and Franz Valley Rd, and on Gordon Valley Rd. near the Solano County border. For the county as a whole we have caught less than 10 moths in the state detection traps for this first flight. Statewide trapping has detected moths so far this season in only Santa Clara and Napa counties. UC Cooperative Extension caught 13 moths in their traps from their monitoring vines last week. This indicates the peak flight of the moths and peak egg-laying period. Eggs from this flight will begin to hatch in 7-11 days depending on the weather. Growers in the treatment area should apply their first spray applications during this time period. Conventional growers using Intrepid or Altacor have the most flexibility with timing since both materials will control the egg and larvae stage of this insect. This spray should be applied at your next fungicide spray timing and 21 days of control should be expected. Only one spray should be needed for this generation of larvae. For growers using materials that only target the larvae, sprays should be delayed until later in the hatch period(approx May 2nd). Organic growers using BT products or Entrust fall into this category, and will need to spray every 7 days until the end of the hatch period. Reapplication after a rain is recommended for the organic products. If you do not have 6 inches of shoot growth you should wait until you reach that stage of growth befor applying this first spray. If moths are caught in or near your vineyard during this first flight and you have not applied Isomate pheromones for mating disruption, it is still not too late to do so. This will help suppress flights and prevent mating for the end of the first flight and for the second and third flights of the moth. Remember, you will need to have five generations without detecting any moths to be able to get out of the quarantine.



Please report any abandoned or unsprayed vineyards in the treatment area to me and we will work on the owners to treat them. Also, be sure to report your Isomate pheromone usage on the monthly pesticide report forms to the Agricultural Commissioner. Looking back to last year at this time we caught close to 99,000 moths in Napa County for this first generation. We have come a long way since then because of all your efforts, but we need to keep up the vigilance of treatments and sanitation of equipment if we want to eventually eliminate it from this county.

Julie said...

5/3/11 update from Martin Mochizuki, Napa County EGVM Grower Liaison

We are continuing to catch moths in the state detection traps in Napa County. So far for this flight we are up to 25 moths compared to around 99,000 moths caught last year during the first flight. There were a couple of new sites where moths were caught on Dunaweal Lane and the lower part of Mt. Veeder Rd. but these were areas that were just outside the 500 meter treatment area from last season. We are now past the peak of the flight so trap numbers should go down over the next couple of weeks. From the UC Cooperative Extension monitoring vines it is evident that egg hatch has started and that peak egg hatch should start this week. Growers who applied Intrepid or Altacor last week or this week should have enough coverage for the rest of the hatch period for the first flight. Organic growers using BT products or Entrust should begin their applications now and repeat every 7 days until the end of the hatch period. If you do not have 6 inches of shoot growth then delay your first application until you reach that stage. Be sure to contact your local PCA and your winery representatives before applying any products. Olive trees close to vineyards in the treatment area should be treated with Dipel or Javelin at bloom. Remember to report all your treatments on your monthly pesticide use reports including the Isomate pheromone dispesers. For anyone still interested in reimbursement for EGVM treatments please contact Kelly Gin at 252-4189 ext.104.

Napa Valley Vintners said...

5/9/11 update from Martin Mochizuki, Napa County EGVM Grower Liaison

European Grapevine moths are still being caught as we near the end of the first flight of moths from the overwintering generation in Napa County. One trap from a previously infested site near Oakville Crossroad caught 17 male moths. This was in an organic vineyard that was not using pheromones for mating disruption. The grower will be placing the Isomate pheromone dispensers up this week. There were a few other finds in previously infested areas and one new site on Petrified Forest Rd near the Sonoma County border. Growers in areas where moths are being caught are being encouraged to use Isomate pheromones if they have not done so already. The total moth count so far for the first generation is around 50. The first spray treatments for the first generation should have been applied by now since we are past the peak of egg hatch of the larvae. Intrepid and Altacor sprays applied in the last 10 days should have enough residue to cover this hatch of the first generation. Organic sprays of BT or Entrust should be repeated every seven days until the end of the hatch period. Remember to check with your PCA and winery representatives beforing applying any products. Also report all products on your monthly pesticide use reports including the Isomate pheromone dispensers. Although it is too early to accurately predict the next application, we are on track with last season and that treatment was applied close to the end of June. We will update you as we get closer based on the UC Cooperative Extension predictions from the degree day model and visual observations from their monitoring vines. Residential treatments in American Canyon and the Carneros area within 500 meters of finds from last sesaon will begin next week. Fruit stripping, pheromones, and BT sprays will be used for these treatments.

Napa Valley Vintners said...

5/15/11 update from Martin Mochizuki, Napa County EGVM Grower Liaison

We are nearing the end of the first flight of European Grapevine Moth in Napa County. There are still larvae emerging from eggs from this first generation. Intrepid and Altacor sprays applied up to this point should have enough residual to control this first generation of larvae. These materials are locally systemic in the cluster and should not need to be reapplied after a rain. Organic materials like the BT products and Entrust should be applied every seven days and will need to be applied after a rain. At least 1-2 more applications of organic products will be needed to cover this hatch period. Please contact your local PCA and winery representatives before applying any products. Olives that are close to vineyards in the treatment area should be treated with Dipel or Javelin at bloom.

There were new finds in a previously unifested area off of Soscol Ferry Rd south of Napa. The grower that is affected by these finds will be applying Isomate pheromones and also will be spraying to control the larvae. If you are in an area where moths are being caught in or around your vineyard and you have not put up Isomate pheromones for mating disruption it is still not too late to do so. These pheromones will help to control the second and third flights of the moths. So far we have caught close to 60 moths in this first genration. We are expecting to catch even fewer in subsequent generations.

Although it is still too early to give exact dates for the timing for the second generation treatments it looks like we are only slightly ahead of last season so treatments should be around the end of June to early July based on last season's model. Cooler areas like Carneros may be slightly later. We will keep you posted as we get closer as this could be moved forward if tempertures warm up dramatically. UC Cooperative Extension will be updating this based on degree days and their monitoring vines.

Residential treatments will be started in the areas of American Canyon and Carneros where moths were found last season. Fruit stripping, BT sprays, and/or pheromones for mating disruption will be used in the residential areas. If you know backyard growers in other parts of the county that are in the treatment area, please encourage them to strip or treat their fruit for this insect.

Napa Valley Vintners said...

5/23/11 update from Martin Mochizuki, Napa County EGVM Grower Liaison

We are at the end of the first flight of adult moths for EGVM in Napa County. So far we have caught 76 male moths in detection traps compared to 99,000 at this time last season. Early instar larvae have been seen in organic vineyards so organic growers must continue to spray every seven days with BT products or Entrust. Also, reapplication will be needed after a rain event such as we had last week. At least one more application will be needed for this generation of larvae for organic growers. Conventional growers that used Intrepid or Altacor can wait until the seond generation for the next application. Always use the highest label rates to get longer lasting control. The Dipel supplemental label for EGVM allows the usage of 2 lb./a. The next flight of moths should be in mid-June with spray applications starting in late June and early July. This is temperature dependent so the timing for this could change if the temperatures are below normal levels.



Olive trees near vineyards should be sprayed with Dipel or Javelin at bloom. Residential treatments have started in infested areas of American Canyon and the Carneros area. Fruit stripping, pheromones, and dipel sprays have been used in these areas.



Other counties that have had detections of moths this season include Santa Clara, Sonoma, and most recently Nevada county with a find near Grass Valley.



Bloomtime leaf and petiole samples are exempt this year from any shipping restrictions so they can be sent to any labs in the country. Other parts of the vine such as spurs, trunks, and canes are still restricted to be shipped to only certified labs in California.

Napa Valley Vintners said...

5/30/11 update from Martin Mochizuki, Napa County EGVM Grower Liaison

We are at the end of the overwintering moth flight in Napa County. However, a few live larvae have been seen in organic vineyards. Organic growers should retreat with BT materials or Entrust if the last treatment was done before last week's rain. There should be one more treatment of one of these materials in all organic vineyards 7 days after the last application, even those that are using mating disruption. The next spray timing should be towards the end of June or early July depending on the weather between now and then. This should be the last time that EGVM will need treatment in most vineyards in the county this season. So far for the first generation we have caught a total of 87 moths in Napa County. 26 of these were from one vineyard. We are anticipating catching even fewer in the second generation.



Olive trees in the treatment area should be sprayed at bloom with Dipel or Javelin.



Residential treatments in American Canyon and Carneros in the treatment area are continuing.



There were no new finds throughout the state this week. So far this season only Napa, Sonoma, Santa Clara, and Nevada counties have caught moths in the state detection traps.



Remember to turn in your pesticide use reports for May, including the Isomate pheromone applications for mating disruption if you have not previously reported them.

Napa Valley Vintners said...

6/6/11 update from Martin Mochizuki, Napa County EGVM Grower Liaison

We are at the end of the first generation of the European Grapevine Moth in Napa County. Late instar larvae are still being found in organic vineyards, even in blocks treated with Isomate for mating disruption. Due to poor coverage from the rain all organic growers should apply one more application of BT or Entrust. This should be applied in the next few days since the larvae will begin to pupate before the end of the week and the sprays will be ineffective against them at that time. Due to the cooler weather we are running about a week behind last season. Thus, the projected application date for the next spray will probably be in the first or second week of July depending on the weather. This should be coordinated to be included in the closest fungicide sprays applied during that period. For conventional growers Intrepid or Altacor should be used and should be alternated from the last application. Organic growers will need to apply 2-3 sprays of BT or Entrust for the next generation of larvae.



Residential treatments continue in the infested areas of American Canyon and Carneros. I have attached a brochure produced by CDFA and the PD-GWSS board, targeting home winemakers. If you have friends or neighbors that make their own wine, please pass this on so that they understand the proper protocols for movement of fruit and disposal of green waste.



Please be sure to report all spray applications for May in your pesticide use reports including the Isomate pheromones for mating disruption.

Napa Valley Vintners said...

6/13/11 update from Martin Mochizuki, Napa County EGVM Grower Liaison

The first generation of European Grapevine Moth in Napa county in 2011 has come to an end. Less than 100 moths were caught in this first flight compared to over 99,000 caught in the first flight last season. Most of the traps where moths were caught had only 1-2 moths compared to many traps last season that were catching over 200 moths in a two week period. There were 4 new areas in the county where moths were caught in the first generation: Gordon Valley (near the Solano county border), Soscol Ferry Rd., Buhman and Crestview (Browns Valley), and on Petrified Forest Rd although this find was just over the border on the Sonoma County side. Nearly 2/3 of the growers in the treatment area used Isomate pheromones for mating disruption. We are still waiting for the final numbers from the pesticide use reports for the spray treatments but it appears that only a handful of properties in the treatment area were not treated in this first generation.



It appears we are still running behind last season for the second flight of EGVM. We should have a better idea this week from the UC Cooperative Extension folks as they monitor for pupa and the first moths of the flight. Based on last season's spray dates, this will push the spray into the first part of July in the Oakville area, and about a week later in cooler areas of the county like Carneros and hillside vineyards. Growers using Intrepid and Altacor have some flexibility on timing since these products will have some effect on eggs as well as larvae. Care should be taken to alternate these products between generations. Other products that have only larvicidal activity will have to be timed closer to the main egg hatch period. Only one treatment of conventional products should be needed for this generation. Organic growers will need to spray at least twice with BT or Entrust. The timing for this can change if we get abnormal temperatures over the next couple of weeks. It will be important to not spray too early since you want to be sure there is enough residue left during the hatch period of the larvae. Since everyone has already set their schedules for fungicide sprays, you will need to pick the timing that comes closest to this hatch period to avoid having to put an extra spray on. Please call me if you have any questions about this since this is a very important spray for control and ultimately for elimination of this insect.



Just a reminder to clean all equipment as you move between vineyards as larvae and pupae can drop off the vines onto any equipment going through the vineyard. Also, be sure to turn in your pesticide use reports including the ones for Isomate pheromones to the agricultural commissioner.

Napa Valley Vintners said...

6/20/11 update from Martin Mochizuki, Napa County EGVM Grower Liaison

Most EGVM in Napa County are in the pupae stage of the first generation. The first moths emerging from these pupae will be monitored by UC Cooperative Extension personnel to verify the timing for treatments, and are expected to emerge this week and the peak of this flight should be in early July. Conventional growers using Intrepid or Altacor have some flexibility with the timing of the spray for the second generation of larvae since they have efficacy on the egg and larvae stage. The projected spray timing for these sprays is from June 27-July 11th. This can be combined with a fungicide spray during this time period. If Intrepid was used in the last spray then you should alternate to Altacor for this spray to offset resistance. Intrepid should be used at 12-16 oz./a and Altacor at 3.2-4.5 oz/a.

Organic vineyards should time their sprays to the start of egg hatch. This is projected for July 4th and will continue for 2-3 weeks. BT and Entrust sprays should be applied every 7 days during that period. Higher rates of these products should be used to get the longest residual. (e.g. Dipel 2 lb/a and Entrust at 2.5 oz/a).

Growers in cooler areas of the county (Carneros, American Canyon, and later hillside vineyards) should delay their sprays one week later from the above projected spray dates. Proper timing is essential for these treatments to be effective, and these sprays are critical for the control of this insect since these will be the last sprays of the season for most growers. Treatment for the third generation of larvae will only be necessary where control was not adequate in the first two generations.

From a statewide prospective, moths from the overwintering flight were only found in Napa, Sonoma, Santa Clara, Nevada, and most recently Santa Cruz county. Other counties where moths were found last season and were not found so far this year may be removed from the quarantine if no more moths are caught this year.

For anyone interested in reimbursement for EGVM treatments the NRCS still has money available. Please contact Kelly Gin at 707-252-4189 ext. 104 for more information.

Napa Valley Vintners said...

6/27/11 update from Martin Mochizuki, Napa County EGVM Grower Liaison

The second flight of EGVM in Napa county has started with two moths found in UC Cooperative Extension traps on Friday. The peak flight is now projected out to the end of the week of July 4th to the week of July 11th. All growers in the treatment area should treat for the second generation larvae regardless if you sprayed or put up pheromone dispensers in the first generation. These will be the last sprays of the season for most growers.



Conventional growers using Intrepid or Altacor should time their application to coincide to their next fungicide spray. The ideal application time for these is the week of July 4th but due to the activity of these products on both the egg and larval stage there is more flexibility, and these sprays should be effective if applied anytime in the next 3 weeks. Mid to high rates of these products should be used to get the longest residual on the expanding berries. Intrepid should be applied at a minimum of 12 oz/a, and Altacor at a minimum of 3.2 oz./a. Cooler areas of the county like Carneros, American Canyon, and the late hillside vineyards should start one week later than the above timing(week of July 4th- week of July 18th).



Organic growers should time their sprays to the start of significant egg hatch. This should be the week of July 11th for most growers and one week later for growers in cooler areas. 2-3 weekly sprays will be needed to cover this hatch. High labeled rates of these products should be used (e.g. Dipel 2 lb./a and Entrust 2.5 oz./a) If there is rainfall of over a quarter of an inch these products will have to be reapplied. Timing and coverage is critical for the organic products as they do not have more than seven days of residual in most cases and are contact sprays. Thus, it is important to open up the fruiting area to allow optimum coverage prior to these sprays.



Please check with your pest control advisor and winery representatives before applying any products.



As always, I am available for discussion of your specific situations if needed.

Napa Valley Vintners said...

7/2/11 update from Martin Mochizuki, Napa County EGVM Grower Liaison

The second generation of EGVM in 2011 in Napa county is well underway, with two more moths found in the UC Cooperative Extension detection traps. According to our local experts Lucia Varela and Monica Cooper the ideal timing for conventional spray applications of Intrepid or Altacor is at 1400 deg days F and for organic growers using BT products or Entrust at 1550 deg days F. At the present rate of accumulation this would be July 4th and July 11th respectively. Cooler areas like Carneros and some later hillside vineyards are about a week behind these dates.



So for all growers in the treatment area, which are all vineyards within 500 meters of any moth finds in 2010 or 2011, treatments of conventional products Intrepid or Altacor should be applied in your next fungicide spray. If this falls a few days before or a few days after the ideal dates it will still be effective since there is a 21 day residual for these products. A minimum of 12 oz of Intrepid or 3.2 oz of Altacor should be used in this application so that only one application will be needed. Organic growers should apply their first application for this generation as close to the ideal date as possible and this should be repeated 7 days later. A third application will be needed if egg hatch is delayed by cooler than normal temperatures. Due to the short persistence of these products high rates should be used (e.g. Dipel 2 lb./a and Entrust 2.5 oz/a). Growers should treat this generation of larvae even if they are using Isomate for mating disruption and have treated the first generation of larvae in 2011. As always, please contact your local pest control advisor and winery representatives before applying any products.



These should be the last sprays for most growers for EGVM this season. Only vineyards with high trap counts, new finds, or where live larvae are found will need to treat for the third generation.



The statewide quarantine has been extended to Santa Cruz county where 2 moths were found near the Aptos area. So far, 129 moths have been found in 2011 in Napa, Sonoma, Santa Clara, Nevada, and Santa Cruz counties. 94 were from Napa county. This compares to 99,000 moths caught at this time last season. Several counties will be in the deregulation process this season since they have not caught any moths yet this year. This involves increasing the trap density to 100 per square mile and if there are no detections for the rest of the year those counties will be removed from the quarantine area. This is why we need your continued support with your treatments for EGVM so that we too can reach that point where the quarantine is removed from Napa County.



Please call me with any questions about vineyards in the treatment area, application timing, or for information on specific products and rates.

Napa Valley Vintners said...

7/10/11 update from Martin Mochizuki, Napa County EGVM Grower Liaison

We are now at the projected peak of the second moth flight of European Grapevine Moth in Napa County. UC Cooperative Extension monitoring traps have picked up 5 moths in the past 3 weeks, but so far the state detection traps have not caught any moths from this generation anywhere in the state. If you have not treated yet for this second generation you should treat this week. All growers who are within 500 meters of a find in 2010 or 2011 should treat for EGVM. Conventional growers should use Intrepid or Altacor. Only one application of these products will be needed for this generation. Organic growers should treat now with Dipel or Entrust and retreat in another 7 days. A third application will be needed if temperatures cool down to below normal temperatures which will delay the hatch of moths. Organic growers in cooler areas like Carneros, American Canyon, and hillside vineyards should delay their first application for this generatuon until around 7/18/11. Conventional growers in those areas should treat this week.



Please check with your local PCA's and your winery representatives before applying any products.



Residential treatments in American Canyon, Carneros, and parts of the city of Napa will continue this week.



Feel free to call if you have any questions about timing, products, rates, or compliance issues.

Napa Valley Vintners said...

7/18/11 update from Martin Mochizuki, Napa County EGVM Grower Liaison

We have reached the peak of the second flight of EGVM moths in Napa County, and we have still not caught any moths in the state detection traps in the initial infested areas of the county. However, last week four moths were caught in the county. One was in Gordon Valley close to the Solano county line near where one moth was caught earlier during the first flight. In addition, three moths were caught in a previously unifested area off of Green Island Rd in the south part of the county. Growers within 500 meters of these finds were contacted and all have agreed to treat these properties.

If you are in the treatment area (any vineyards within 500 meters of an EGVM find in 2010 or 2011) and you have not treated yet for the second generation of larvae, now is the time to do so. Conventional growers should use Intrepid or Altacor, and organic growers should use BT products or Entrust. Organic growers should apply a minimum of two applications for this second generation about 7 days apart. Please contact your local PCA and winery representatives before applying any materials.

Residential treatments are continuing in Carneros, American Canyon, and parts of the city of Napa. Crews will either be spraying with Dipel, placing pheromone ties or dropping the grape clusters depending on the preference of the homeowner. If you have any questions about these crews working on your properties, reference the name on their badge and call the Agricultural Commissioners office for verification.

Napa Valley Vintners said...

7/25/11 update from Martin Mochizuki, Napa County EGVM Grower Liaison

We are now past the projected peak of the second flight of EGVM in Napa County and we have not caught any moths in the core infested area from Yountville to St. Helena during this second flight. UC Cooperative Extension monitoring efforts have not turned up any life stages in the last two weeks. However, the state detection traps have caught moths in 2 other locations this week . One area was a previously infested area by Bennett Lane north of Calistoga, and three moths were caught in a new area off of Spring Mountain Rd and Langtry Lane. Growers were informed of the finds and most had already treated for the second generation. Growers in the new area will be treating this week.

If you are in the treatment area (vineyards within 500 meters of a find in 2010 or 2011) and you have not treated yet for the second generation you should do so now. Conventional growers should use Intrepid or Altacor. Organic growers in later areas should be finishing up their second applications for this second generation of larvae. BT products or Entrust should be used for this spray. These should be the last applications of the season for most growers except for vineyards in newly infested areas.

So far we have caught a total of just over 100 moths in the first and second generations of 2011 in Napa County, compared to over 100,000 moths for the first and second generations of 2010. Thanks to eveyone for all your hard work to get us to where we are now.

Napa Valley Vintners said...

8/1/11 update from Martin Mochizuki, Napa County EGVM Grower Liaison

We are at the end of the second flight of EGVM in Napa County. We caught a few more moths in the Taplin Rd. area east of St. Helena last week. The total for the second flight now stands at 15 from 5 sites. There have been no finds so far from this flight in the previously infested core areas from Yountville to St. Helena, and in the Third avenue/Coombsville area. The total for both the first and second flights for 2011 is 109. Statewide, there have been no other finds so far for this second flight other than in Napa County. Sprays at this time will only be needed if you have not previously treated both generations or there are new finds during this flight.

Residential treatments in Napa, Carneros, and American Canyon are also wrapping up. So far a total of 845 residences have been treated with either pheromones or fruit was stripped from host plants. This has been a very successful program and some valuable lessons have been learned so we can continue the fight in earnest next season in the residential areas.

Maturity sampling for grapes will be handled similar to last season. Fresh samples from infested areas should be in sealed bags, and the winery should dispose of crushed grapes as unfermented green waste. Juice samples are exempt from these restrictions. If clusters or grape berry samples from Napa county are going to a winery not in a quarantined area than they will need a compliance agreement as a receiver of grapes from a quarantined area. Also, if they are going to a private lab for analysis the lab will need state certification.

Please call if you have any questions.

Julie said...

8/8/11 update from Martin Mochizuki, Napa County EGVM Grower Liaison

The second flight of the European Grapevine Moth has come to an end in Napa county. Projections by UC Cooperative Extension indicate that mid to late instar larvae should be present on the clusters based on the degree day model. So if you have not applied a treatment for this second generation of larvae you can still do so and get effective control. So far in Napa County there have been 15 moths caught during this second flight, and 109 total moths for the first two flights of 2011. In 2010 there were 1284 moths caught in the second generation and over 100,000 total moths at this stage. The third flight of moths for 2011 is expected to start in 2-3 weeks.

Residential treatments are finishing up in some areas of the city of Napa with residences having the option of pheromone treatment or stripping of fruit.

Please remember to turn in all treatments for EGVM to the Agricultural Commissioners office with your pesticide use reports. These reports are critical for future planning by USDA and CDFA for control efforts and subsequent lifting of the quarantine.

Napa Valley Vintners said...

8/15/11 update from Martin Mochizuki, Napa County EGVM Grower Liaison

We are close to the end of the second generation of EGVM in Napa County. One moth was found in a trap where a few moths were caught earlier on Spring Mountain Rd near Langtry Rd. All growers within 500 meters of the find have treated. This moth was most likely a remnant of the second flight. This brings the total moth count for the second flight to 16. The third(and last) flight of the season is projected by UC Cooperative Extension to start at the end of the month. No more treatments are expected except where there are finds in previously untreated areas.

As a reminder, compliance agreements are required for all growers, wineries,and haulers of grapes in Napa County. Last year's agreements are acceptable this year but they will need to be updated if you are farming new vineyards. Also, the Agricultural Commissioner will be sending out an update to the compliance agreements with a few new addendums. If you do not receive them in the next two weeks please call the Commissioner's office at 253-4357.

All growers who are planning to ship fresh grapes out of the state will need to contact the Commissioner's office so they can start monitoring your vineyard to certify that it is pest free so it can be cleared to ship.

Napa Valley Vintners said...

8/29/11 update from Martin Mochizuki, Napa County EGVM Grower Liaison

The third flight of European Grapevine Moth in Napa County is expected to start this week in the warmer regions of Napa Valley. The flight in cooler areas like Carneros and later hillside vineyards is projected to be about the middle of September. No treatments are recommended for this third generation of EGVM. The total for the second flight in Napa County was 16 moths. These were the only moths caught in the state during the second flight.



As a reminder, compliance agreements from last season are still valid for 2011, however there are new exhibits that must be read and signed to update your agreement. These must be sent in, dropped off, or faxed into the Agricultural Commissioner's office. If you have not received these exhibits please call the Ag. Commissioners office at 253-4357 or download from their website at http://www.countyofnapa.org/Pages/DepartmentContent.aspx?id=4294974290

Napa Valley Vintners said...

9/1/11 update from Martin Mochizuki, Napa County EGVM Grower Liaison

The third flight of EGVM in the warmer areas of Napa County was projected to begin last week, but so far no moths have been caught in the state detection traps. The flight is projected to start in the cooler areas next week.

Just a reminder to sign and send in all new exhibits to the compliance agreements so the Agricultural Commissioner can update your agreement on their list on the website. If you have not received these new exhibits they are available by calling the Ag. Commissioner at 253-4357 or by downloading them from the website at http://www.countyofnapa.org/AgCommissioner/EGM/ , go to information for growers and wineries and then to the page for compliance agreements.

Now that we are approaching harvest, please be on the alert for any EGVM damage on the clusters. If you or your crews see any evidence of feeding damage from the larvae or an unusual amount of rot associated with larval feeding please take a sample and give me a call or bring it in for identification. We are not anticipating seeing any substantial damage due to the low populations at this point, but it is important to gauge the effectiveness of the program by the amount of damage we might see at harvest.

The Technical Working Group (TWG) will be meeting in December to evaluate the control efforts in the various counties and they will be making recommendations for how we will proceed next year in the deregulation process.

This will be the last weekly update of the season, but I will continue to send out updates if we begin to catch moths or see significant damage from this third flight. Thank you all for your continued cooperation to make this such a successful control effort in Napa County. Have a good harvest!

Napa Valley Vintners said...

9/20/11 update from Martin Mochizuki, Napa County EGVM Grower Liaison

One moth has been found so far in state detection traps in Napa county from the third fight of European Grapevine Moth. This is the only find anywhere in the state at this point in the third flight. This moth was found in a previously infested vineyard near Lake Hennesey, east of St. Helena. From the degree day model we are past the midpoint of the flight in the warmer areas of the county and at the beginning of the flight in the cooler areas. The Technical Working Group does not recommend treatment at this time of the season.

A summary of the trap catches so far in Napa County for 2011 is as follows:
first flight- 94 moths
second flight- 16 moths
third flight- 1 moth

As a reminder, in 2010, we caught over 100,000 moths in Napa County, so we have come a long way from last year thanks to all of your efforts.

The Technical Working Group will be meeting in December to evaluate the control in 2011 and to determine steps for deregulation in the future.

Napa Valley Vintners said...

No moths were found this week as we have started into the predicted timing for the start of the next flight of EGVM in Napa County. The predicted egg-laying and egg-hatch of the 2nd generation of European Grapevine Moth in Napa County has been delayed slightly from the original projections due to cooler than normal temperatures. Growers should follow the following timelines for treatment:
Warmer areas of Napa County from Yountville to St. Helena-conventional growers using ovicidal/larvicidal materials like Altacor and Intrepid- add materials to next mildew spray. Growers using larvicidal materials including organic growers should start treating the week of July 2nd. Organic growers using Bt products or Entrust should repeat this treatment in 7 days.
Cooler areas of Napa County like American Canyon and Carneros, and later areas such as most hillside vineyards, East Napa, Calistoga, and Pope Valley should not start treating with conventional materials until the week of July 9th. Organic growers in these areas should start treating the week of July 16th and repeat BT or Entrust sprays in 7 days.
All growers who used pheromones for mating disruption and all growers in the treatment areas of Pope Valley, Chiles Valley, Gordon Valley, and the Howell Mountain and Angwin areas should treat for this second generation of larvae. Please contact me if you have any questions about materials or treatment timing for this application.

The abandoned vineyard on Bennett Lane north of Calistoga will be removed this week through the abatement process by the Napa County Ag. Commissioners office. Residential properties in the Olive Hill Lane area east of Napa will be recontacted later this week by CDFA and Ag. Commisioner's personnel to confirm compliance to treatment procedures.

Please remember to turn in your treatments on your monthly pesticide use reports.

Napa Valley Vintners said...

Two more moths were reported a week ago in the abandoned vineyard on Bennett Lane north of Calistoga. This vineyard has since been removed and the vines are piled up to burn. Since this is a later area it is presumed that these moths were still from the first flight of EGVM. So far no moths have been caught yet from the second flight. The total for the first flight of EGVM in Napa County in 2012 was 77 moths compared to 96 in 2011 and 99,000 in 2010. All of the moths caught so far this season were caught near residential vineyards, abandoned vineyards, or in previously uninfested vineyards that were not treated in previous seasons. It is of the utmost importance that all growers treat again for the second generation of EGVM even if you have used pheromones for mating disruption. This will be the last scheduled applications for this season.

If you have not treated yet for the second generation of EGVM larvae this should be done in your next mildew spray application for all conventional growers using Intrepid or Altacor. Growers using other larvicides and organic materials should start treating this week in the warmer areas of Napa county from Yountville to St. Helena. Organic growers in cooler or later areas of the county such as Carneros, American Canyon, East Napa, hillside vineyards, Calistoga, Pope Valley, and Chiles Valley should start their applications the week of July 16th. Organic growers should use a minimum of two applications of BT products or Entrust.

CDFA, in conjunction with Napa County Agricultural Commissioners office, will be conducting public meetings and a neighborhood awareness program in the Olive Hill area to confirm that control measures are being implemented in residential vineyards in that area.

As a reminder , please turn in all spray applications for EGVM in your pesticide use reports. Feel free to contact me if you have any questions about materials or timing of spray applications for EGVM.

Napa Valley Vintners said...

We are well into the second flight of European Grapevine Moth in Napa County and as of last week there have been no confirmed finds for this flight. Conventional growers in all areas of the county should have treated or be in the process of treating with Intrepid, Altacor or other larvicides. Organic growers in the warmer areas from Yountville to St. Helena should be treating with their second or third application of BT products or Entrust. Organic growers in the cooler areas such as Carneros, American Canyon, East Napa, or later areas such as Calistoga, Pope Valley, Chiles Valley and hillside vineyards should start treating this week with the first of weekly sprays with BT products or Entrust. All growers should treat for this generation, even if you used pheromones for mating disruption and treated the first generation. Please contact me if you have any questions about the timing, materials, or rates for this application.

Representative from CDFA and the Napa County Agricultural Commissioners office placed pheromone dispensers or stripped fruit in backyard vineyards in the Olive Hill area east of the city of Napa this past week. Also, the Agricultural Commissioners office will be sponsoring three meetings to review the compliance agreements and harvest sanitation requirements for EGVM. All growers, shippers, and wineries should try to attend one of these meetings. They will be held:
Tuesday, July 24th at 2:30 at the Tucker Farm Center in Calistoga
Wednesday, July 25th at 10 am at the Rutherford Grange
Thursday, July 26th at 10 am at the UC Cooperative Extension office in Napa

Finally, just another reminder to turn in your pesticide use report information on a monthly basis. There are still growers who have received Isomate pheromones but have not reported this application on their monthly use reports. It is very important that this information is reported as future considerations for treatment and quarantine areas will be based on these reports.

Napa Valley Vintners said...

We are well into the second flight of EGVM in Napa County and so far no moths have been caught for this generation. Growers using conventional insecticides like Intrepid and Altacor should have applied these sprays for the second generation, and organic growers should be finishing up their second or third spray applications for this generation of BT products or Entrust. After these sprays are applied, no more spray applications should be needed this season.

All growers, shippers, and wineries in the county are required to have a compliance agreement. All loads of grapes will need to be tarped or if applicable can be slack filled prior to hauling. All harvest equipment including trucks, trailers, bins, harvesters, and tractors will need to be cleaned of any fruit debris prior to being moved between vineyards. There will be three meetings this week to review the criteria for hauling and sanitation practices. These meetings will be held :
Tuesday July 24th at 1 pm at the Tucker Farm Center in Calistoga
Wednesday July 25th at 10 am at the Rutherford Grange
Thursday July 26th at 10 am at the Napa County Farm Advisors conference room in Napa

Please contact me if you have any questions.

Martin Mochizuki
Napa County EGVM Grower Liaison
707-975-2133

Napa Valley Vintners said...

We are approaching the end of the second flight of EGVM in the warmer areas of the county and there have still been no moths caught for this generation. Conventional growers should have finished their sprays in all areas of the county. Organic growers in the warmer areas should also be finished with their multiple applications, and organic growers in the cooler or later areas should be finishing up their last sprays of BT products or Entrust this week.

As a reminder, at harvest all bins must be tarped or slack-filled before shipping to the winery. In addition, all equipment and bins must be cleaned prior to moving between vineyards. Even harvest rental equipment should be cleaned prior to returning to the leasing company. This includes: tractors, lights, bins, trucks, and forklifts.

Finally, if you will be moving fruit out of the county you will need to contact the Agricultural Commissioner in the county you are shipping to at least 24 hr in advance. If you are shipping out of state you will need to contact the Napa County Agricultural Commisioner's office immediately so that proper monitoring and inspections of your vineyard can be done.

Martin Mochizuki
Napa County EGVM Grower Liaison
707-975-2133
707-252-9218 fax
martinmoch@sbcglobal.net

Napa Valley Vintners said...

We are in the latter portion of the predicted second flight of European Grapevine Moth in Napa County and so far no moths have been caught for this flight. All sprays for this flight should now have been applied. No more treatments are scheduled for this season.

All loads of grapes from Napa County must be tarped or slack-filled. Slack-filled loads must be filled to no higher than 4 inches below the rim of the bin or 12 inches for machine harvested loads. Bins must be cleaned before they are returned to the vineyard. All equipment must also be cleaned before moving to another vineyard.

Please remember to turn in your pesticide use reports for all your pesticide applications. These will be very important for determining compliance issues as well as for the evaluation for next year's program by the Technical Working Group.

Martin Mochizuki
Napa County EGVM Grower Liaison
707-975-2133
707-252-9218 fax
martinmoch@sbcglobal.net

Napa Valley Vintners said...

We are at the end of the second flight of EGVM in the warmer areas of Napa County and so far no moths have been trapped for this generation. There have been a total of 77 moths caught this season in sharp contrast to the 100,000 moths caught in spring of 2010. All of the moths caught this season can be attributed to vineyards that were not treated the previous year. Most of these were from residential or abandoned vineyards. Compliance to treatments for EGVM has been good for 2012 with nearly all growers in the treatment area taking advantage of the subsidized pheromone program, and most growers also applying spray treatments for the first two generations. We should be able to finalize these numbers once all the pesticide use reports have been turned in.

No moths outside of Napa County have been caught yet this season. There is a good possiblity that all previously infested counties will be removed from the quarantine by next year. This will only leave Napa County and neighboring areas of Solano and Sonoma counties still in the quarantine area. We will know by the end of the year what is in store for Napa County after the Technical Working Group submits their recommendations to USDA and CDFA. It is possible that some areas of the county may be targeted for removal from the quarantine at the end of 2013 if they are 3 miles from finds from this season and remain free of EGVM with high density trapping. Isomate pheromone use will probably be curtailed so that detection traps will work to their optimum, but spray treatments will need to be applied for the first two flights next season regardless of the outcome of the TWG recommendations.

Compliance to sanitation and harvest requirements should be followed closely to prevent any spread of EGVM at harvest this season. I have attached a memo from the Napa County Agricultural Commissioners office on compliance and harvest inspections by their office. Their website has information on compliance issues including sanitation, tarping or short-filling of loads, and green waste disposal. Please call them or me if you have questions on these subjects.

Finally, this will be the final EGVM update of 2012. Thank you all for your cooperation and continued efforts to get us to where we are now in this program. We are more confidant then ever that we can get rid of this pest from Napa County but it will depend on your continued vigilance in the future. Please feel free to call me with any questions and good luck with harvest.

Martin Mochizuki
Napa County EGVM Grower Liaison
707-975-2133
707-252-9218 fax
martinmoch@sbcglobal.net